anxiety

Posted: August 25, 2015
By: Clay Cerny

 

I admire former Labor Secretary Robert Reich’ ability to take complex ideas and present them in language that should be accessible to most working people. Citing the coming of Labor Day, Reich reflects on the “shared” or “on call” work models that are becoming more and more popular as ways to staff and manage employees. He cites studies that say 40% of Americans can be working under such conditions over the next five years.

From the employer’s standpoint, this model makes sense. Why pay people to work when they are not needed? The problem with this business model, as Reich points out, is that it gives the loyal no security. They don’t know when or how they will earn their next dollar. The worst part of such a work schedule is that it leaves works panicked about their future. We need to respect labor and have laws that limit employers’ ability to offer “uncertain” work.

Posted: October 18, 2014
By: Clay Cerny

 

Clients often come to me to help with interview preparation. In almost every case, they express anxiety about the process. This is true of young people starting their career and senior level professionals. What’s behind this concern? Practice. We do our jobs every day and are confident we can do them. Depending on how long we have been with an employer and how long it takes to find a job, a person could go on just a few interviews over span of years or decades. Confident professionals are often terrified to go on job interviews.

Interviewing is a skill, and, like any skill, it takes practice. Imagine if you played golf or pool or bowling (individual sports). If you played that sport on a regular basis, you would know your level of skill. We are anxious when we interview because we do it so infrequently. If you were a good golfer, but hadn’t picked up your clubs for ten years, you would approach the first tee with anxiety. The same principle holds true in interviewing.

What can you do to be calmer? First, practice your skills. Focus on building a dialogue with the interviewer and demonstrating your strengths. Another cause of anxiety at job interviews is the mistaken belief that a job interview is like a test. Applicants are so worried about how they word an answer and giving the “best” answer that qualified people make themselves sound like they can’t do the job. Listen to what the interviewer is saying, and engage in a conversation. That will help calm things down. The most important thing you can do to be calm at an interview is to know your strengths and present them in a way that makes the employer want to hire you.

Interviewing is never easy. But, if you practice the right way, it can be less stressful.

Posted: August 3, 2012
By: Clay Cerny

I’m becoming a big fan of the website Big Think.  It’s like TED without the videos.  Thinkers of all stripes share interesting ideas and insights.  One that caught my eye today is Jason Gots' “What Are You Worth?  Getting Past Status Anxiety.”

Gots explores the ideas of the French writer Alain de Botton, who thinks we trap ourselves through our work life identities.  Too many people live to have the impressive title or work for the impressive firm.  Rather than play this snob game without a winner, de Botton suggests that we think about who we really are and focus more on our friends than our jobs.

That’s great advice. We work to live better lives.  When our work becomes our life and our identity, we are little more than slaves (self-imposed slavery).  Big thanks to Jason Gots for sharing de Botton's insights in a clear, concise article.

Here is a list of Jason’s writing for Big Think.  They are worth your time.