emotional intelligence

Posted: May 30, 2015
By: Clay Cerny

 

Sam Walton founded one of the world’s most successful companies, Walmart. He grew a local business to a global corporate leader. He also left behind some great career advice in these words:

“High expectations are everything.”

My most successful clients have been those who believe in themselves. These people are always looking to take the next step in their career. They are not afraid of failing. They don’t let unfair criticism from a boss or co-worker doubt their ability. The first step to being successful is believing in yourself.

 

Posted: January 2, 2015
By: Clay Cerny

 

We all have habits we’d like to break. In an article posted on LinkedIn, Daniel Goleman offers some great ideas about how we can do that.  His approach is practical and clear. I don’t know if I can break all of my habits, but now I have a good tool box to work with. Thank you, Mr. Goleman.

Posted: February 19, 2014
By: Clay Cerny

I’ve come across several resume experts who say that it is impossible to convey personality on a resume.  Nothing could be further from the truth.  Soft skills and qualities give an employer a good indication of the kind of person you are and the kind of worker you will be.

For example, a word like flexible indicates that someone can fill different roles.  It is important to follow up on this point in the resume and show how you are versatile and able to take on different roles.  Similarly, a popular word in job postings that I often use in resume is proactive.  Someone who is proactive either prevents a problem from happening or solves it without being told to do so.  These are just two examples of how a personality can be conveyed as part of a well-written resume.  Here are a few other terms that you can use to give an employer a sense of what you offer:

detail-oriented

outgoing

creative

dedicated

persistent

customer-focused

self-motivated

self-starter

Many job posts include these terms.  Find a way to integrate them into your resume so the employer can tell who you are as well as what you do.

Posted: January 23, 2013
By: Clay Cerny

Huffington Post offers a short, but insightful article by Steve Tobak of Inc.  The premise is simple – 9 sentences that could kill your career, which grabs our attention.  The real advice is to communicate professionally in an office environment.  Don’t discuss topics that can lead to arguments.  Don’t gossip.  Don’t spread rumors or bad news that has nothing to do with your job.  I especially like Tobak’s last point:  Don’t put in writing.

Think before you speak, and remember that you’re at work.  What you say has consequences, and it can be used against you.  Saying the right thing is an important part of career management.