qualifications

Posted: August 26, 2015
By: Clay Cerny

 

Recently, I met with Jake (not his real name), a mid-career sales professional, who said he wanted a basic resume. Jake told me, “The facts speak for themselves.” It’s not that simple.

I want to be honest in representing clients, but it’s important to do so in a way that highlights each individual’s qualifications and strengths. The resume also needs to show qualifications for the job you are applying for. Too often, clients have given me resumes that are very detailed – very factual – about jobs they want to leave behind. A good resume will demonstrate what you can do for your next employer, not the last one.

I worked with Jake, and together we produced a strong document that will speak to the kind of employers he wants to work for. Because we’ve called out some of his strongest selling points, we’ve taken the facts and made them show Jake’s value over other applicants. If you can do that, the phone will ring.

Posted: July 29, 2015
By: Clay Cerny

 

I talked with two clients recently who were hired to dream jobs.  In both cases, the client hesitated before applying for the position.  Steve wanted a position in Europe.  However, his heart dropped when he saw the requirements:  MBA and second language.  Steve had a BA and only spoke English.  Then he read the position again and felt that no one could be more qualified based on his experience and achievements.  He took a chance and was rewarded with his dream job.  Mary works in human services as a counselor.  She's performed managerial duties, but never held the title of manager.  We wrote her resume to emphasize her roles that required leadership and decision making.  Again, Mary didn't think she'd get the job.  She applied, went through four interviews, and received an offer.  If you think you capable of doing a job, don't be afraid to apply.  The trick to getting the job is to show how you are qualified.  You need to do this in your resume and during interviews.  Employers will look beyond their requirements if you show them why you're the right person.  Don't be afraid to the chance.  That's the only way to find your dream job.

Posted: July 7, 2014
By: Clay Cerny

 

Every job posting asks for a combination of experience, knowledge, skill, and education. Another way to think about this is "weight." The employer wants to know that you can carry the load of a given job. For example, an entry level job will ask for less weight than one that looks for 3-5 years experience or a background supervising or training employees. In writing your resume or presenting yourself at an interview, you need to be able to show how and why you are qualified to do the job. Look carefully at job posts for positions you are seeking and identify the kind of weight the employer is seeking. Show that you can carry the load.

Posted: April 12, 2014
By: Clay Cerny

One of my clients is in his late 20s. He’s been a Program Manager for the last 18 months. When I ran into him recently, he told me that he wants to leave his current job but can’t because he hasn’t been there two years. I asked him, “What’s the difference between a year and a half and two years?” For a company looking for a manager with 1-3 years’ experience, he fits the qualifications. He’s not looking to move up in his career at this point. Why not make a lateral move? Why does my client want to move? His boss is not supportive, and there is some chance he could be fired or demoted. Now is the time for him to move.