Redeye

Posted: June 24, 2015
By: Clay Cerny

 

Yesterday’s Redeye (Chicago Tribune) featured an interesting article on the growing time between first interviews and the time a job offer is made. In 2010 the average time for the interviewing process was 13 days. Now, according to research by Glassdoor.com, the average time is now 23 days. A client who is senior HR manager told me that this process is a good thing for both companies and applicants because more time is being taken to match the right candidate to the right job. She said companies lose millions when new hires wash out in the first 90 days.

That may be true. However, from the job seeker’s prospective, this increased waiting time sounds maddening. Part of the job search now means being more patient once the interviewing process begins. It also means that while you are interviewing you need to continue looking for other jobs. Just as a company focuses on its needs in evaluating and selecting candidates, job seekers need to give themselves every advantage and opportunity. Don’t wait for an answer that you might not want to hear. Keep applying for jobs and networking. You can always tell employers that you’ve accept a position. It will feel good.

Posted: August 14, 2014
By: Clay Cerny

 

Megan Crepeau of Redeye (Chicago Tribune) has written a great article on wage theft.

If you're not familiar with this term, please read the article.  Wage theft affects many low wage workers in the hospitality industry.  It needs to end.

Posted: October 10, 2013
By: Clay Cerny

According to a Gallup Poll cited in today’s Redeye, workers across the world are not engaged in their jobs.  Only one in six people polled claimed to find meaning in their work.  Results were slightly better in the U.S. and Canada where a whopping 29% called themselves engaged.

What do these numbers mean for us as individual workers?  First, it indicates that much work available today is not stimulating or challenging.  I would add as a second point that the people on the job help make it good or bad.  When we work for a bad company or a tyrant boss, the type of work doesn’t matter.  The job will suck, and we hate going to work.  I’ve been there, and so has everyone I know.

Many workers in the U.S., especially those with higher education or specialized training, at least have some choices and options.  I recommend that clients try to align the type of work they do to their gifts, the type of skills they most like to use.  It’s not always easy to find such jobs, but the pay off is worth the effort.  Here’s a first step: Don’t stay in a job that makes you feel miserable.  According to Gallup, about one in three Americans are happy in their jobs.  Do everything you can to be part of that group.